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Study: Consumers to cut back

Study: Consumers to cut back


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Consumers say they will likely cut back on restaurant visits in 2012, and spend less money on dining out, a new report by restaurant and foodservice consulting firm AlixPartners LLP finds.

Consumers overall expect their restaurant visits to decline by about 3 percent in 2012, according to the report, from 11.7 monthly visits in last year’s second quarter to 11.3 monthly visits this year.

Most consumers said they were cutting back on dining out for financial reasons, but many also named a desire to eat more healthfully. A desire for value and convenience also played heavily into their dining-out decisions.

After a tough 2011 marred by spikes in commodity costs, price competition and the general lack of consumer confidence, restaurant chains saw the dining public split into two categories: the 1 percent, or high-end diners who are spending again; and the 99 percent, who are searching for affordable meals that don’t sacrifice quality.

“The industry most certainly is rebounding, but slowly,” said Adam Werner, managing director and co-leader of the restaurant and foodservice practice for AlixPartners. “Companies are going to have to become more defensive. It’s more of a share game. In order for me to grow, I have to steal from you.”

Key trends for 2012: Value, convenience, health

While quality food remains the No. 1 factor influencing restaurant choice, value, convenience and healthfulness are also key trends for the year ahead, the report said.

Consumers said they plan to pay about 5 percent less in restaurants in 2012 compared with last year, in part because of promotions and dining deals that drive traffic.

The average amount spent per meal is expected to drop to $13.30 this year, compared with $14 last year, the report found.

“Discounting is here to stay,” Werner said, and restaurant chains will continue to use bundled meals to convey value.

Pricing, however, will also become more sophisticated, with many chains using tiered strategies, varying prices by region or based on consumer demographics, and raising prices only on select or non-core items.


Percentage of U.S. Adults Trying to Cut Down or Avoid Gluten in Their Diets Reaches New High in 2013, Reports NPD

Chicago, March 6, 2013 —As of this January about a third of U.S. adults say they want to cut down or be free of gluten in their diets, the highest percentage making this claim since The NPD Group, a leading global information company, began asking the question in 2009. NPD’s Dieting Monitor,which continually tracks on a bi-weekly basis top-of-mind dieting and nutrition-related issues facing consumers, reports that 30 percent of adults, one in every three adults, claimed to cut down on or avoid gluten completely in January 2013.

“I’m trying to cut back/avoid Gluten in my diet.”

Source: The NPD Group/Dieting Monitor, 52 week data year ending January 30, 2013

“For as long as NPD has been tracking the eating habits of Americans, which is since 1976, they have been expressing a desire to eat healthier foods and beverages,” says Harry Balzer, chief industry analyst and author of Eating Patterns in America. “It’s not that we want health and wellness more but that we are constantly changing how we address health and wellness. A generation ago health was about avoiding fat, cholesterol, sugar, and sodium in our diet. While those desires still exist for many, they no longer are growing concerns. Today, increasingly more of us want to avoid gluten in our diet and right now it is nearly 30 percent of the adult population… and it’s growing. This is the health issue of the day.”

Balzer points out that as recently as 2011, it appeared that this “health” trend might have run its course, but then more Americans started to say they would like to cut back or avoid gluten in their diet. With the latest information collected from NPD’s Dieting Monitor, a greater portion of the adult population is interested in cutting back on or avoiding gluten in their diet than ever before reported.

Interest in gluten-free menu items at restaurants is also growing. In NPD’s CREST® foodservice market research, which tracks daily how consumers use restaurants, consumers are asked if they ordered something off the menu that was listed as high protein, whole grain, sugar-free, or described in another way. The incidence of consumers ordering food described on the menu as gluten-free or wheat-free has grown over time and is now more than double what it was four years ago – accounting for over 200 million restaurant visits in the past year.


Percentage of U.S. Adults Trying to Cut Down or Avoid Gluten in Their Diets Reaches New High in 2013, Reports NPD

Chicago, March 6, 2013 —As of this January about a third of U.S. adults say they want to cut down or be free of gluten in their diets, the highest percentage making this claim since The NPD Group, a leading global information company, began asking the question in 2009. NPD’s Dieting Monitor,which continually tracks on a bi-weekly basis top-of-mind dieting and nutrition-related issues facing consumers, reports that 30 percent of adults, one in every three adults, claimed to cut down on or avoid gluten completely in January 2013.

“I’m trying to cut back/avoid Gluten in my diet.”

Source: The NPD Group/Dieting Monitor, 52 week data year ending January 30, 2013

“For as long as NPD has been tracking the eating habits of Americans, which is since 1976, they have been expressing a desire to eat healthier foods and beverages,” says Harry Balzer, chief industry analyst and author of Eating Patterns in America. “It’s not that we want health and wellness more but that we are constantly changing how we address health and wellness. A generation ago health was about avoiding fat, cholesterol, sugar, and sodium in our diet. While those desires still exist for many, they no longer are growing concerns. Today, increasingly more of us want to avoid gluten in our diet and right now it is nearly 30 percent of the adult population… and it’s growing. This is the health issue of the day.”

Balzer points out that as recently as 2011, it appeared that this “health” trend might have run its course, but then more Americans started to say they would like to cut back or avoid gluten in their diet. With the latest information collected from NPD’s Dieting Monitor, a greater portion of the adult population is interested in cutting back on or avoiding gluten in their diet than ever before reported.

Interest in gluten-free menu items at restaurants is also growing. In NPD’s CREST® foodservice market research, which tracks daily how consumers use restaurants, consumers are asked if they ordered something off the menu that was listed as high protein, whole grain, sugar-free, or described in another way. The incidence of consumers ordering food described on the menu as gluten-free or wheat-free has grown over time and is now more than double what it was four years ago – accounting for over 200 million restaurant visits in the past year.


Percentage of U.S. Adults Trying to Cut Down or Avoid Gluten in Their Diets Reaches New High in 2013, Reports NPD

Chicago, March 6, 2013 —As of this January about a third of U.S. adults say they want to cut down or be free of gluten in their diets, the highest percentage making this claim since The NPD Group, a leading global information company, began asking the question in 2009. NPD’s Dieting Monitor,which continually tracks on a bi-weekly basis top-of-mind dieting and nutrition-related issues facing consumers, reports that 30 percent of adults, one in every three adults, claimed to cut down on or avoid gluten completely in January 2013.

“I’m trying to cut back/avoid Gluten in my diet.”

Source: The NPD Group/Dieting Monitor, 52 week data year ending January 30, 2013

“For as long as NPD has been tracking the eating habits of Americans, which is since 1976, they have been expressing a desire to eat healthier foods and beverages,” says Harry Balzer, chief industry analyst and author of Eating Patterns in America. “It’s not that we want health and wellness more but that we are constantly changing how we address health and wellness. A generation ago health was about avoiding fat, cholesterol, sugar, and sodium in our diet. While those desires still exist for many, they no longer are growing concerns. Today, increasingly more of us want to avoid gluten in our diet and right now it is nearly 30 percent of the adult population… and it’s growing. This is the health issue of the day.”

Balzer points out that as recently as 2011, it appeared that this “health” trend might have run its course, but then more Americans started to say they would like to cut back or avoid gluten in their diet. With the latest information collected from NPD’s Dieting Monitor, a greater portion of the adult population is interested in cutting back on or avoiding gluten in their diet than ever before reported.

Interest in gluten-free menu items at restaurants is also growing. In NPD’s CREST® foodservice market research, which tracks daily how consumers use restaurants, consumers are asked if they ordered something off the menu that was listed as high protein, whole grain, sugar-free, or described in another way. The incidence of consumers ordering food described on the menu as gluten-free or wheat-free has grown over time and is now more than double what it was four years ago – accounting for over 200 million restaurant visits in the past year.


Percentage of U.S. Adults Trying to Cut Down or Avoid Gluten in Their Diets Reaches New High in 2013, Reports NPD

Chicago, March 6, 2013 —As of this January about a third of U.S. adults say they want to cut down or be free of gluten in their diets, the highest percentage making this claim since The NPD Group, a leading global information company, began asking the question in 2009. NPD’s Dieting Monitor,which continually tracks on a bi-weekly basis top-of-mind dieting and nutrition-related issues facing consumers, reports that 30 percent of adults, one in every three adults, claimed to cut down on or avoid gluten completely in January 2013.

“I’m trying to cut back/avoid Gluten in my diet.”

Source: The NPD Group/Dieting Monitor, 52 week data year ending January 30, 2013

“For as long as NPD has been tracking the eating habits of Americans, which is since 1976, they have been expressing a desire to eat healthier foods and beverages,” says Harry Balzer, chief industry analyst and author of Eating Patterns in America. “It’s not that we want health and wellness more but that we are constantly changing how we address health and wellness. A generation ago health was about avoiding fat, cholesterol, sugar, and sodium in our diet. While those desires still exist for many, they no longer are growing concerns. Today, increasingly more of us want to avoid gluten in our diet and right now it is nearly 30 percent of the adult population… and it’s growing. This is the health issue of the day.”

Balzer points out that as recently as 2011, it appeared that this “health” trend might have run its course, but then more Americans started to say they would like to cut back or avoid gluten in their diet. With the latest information collected from NPD’s Dieting Monitor, a greater portion of the adult population is interested in cutting back on or avoiding gluten in their diet than ever before reported.

Interest in gluten-free menu items at restaurants is also growing. In NPD’s CREST® foodservice market research, which tracks daily how consumers use restaurants, consumers are asked if they ordered something off the menu that was listed as high protein, whole grain, sugar-free, or described in another way. The incidence of consumers ordering food described on the menu as gluten-free or wheat-free has grown over time and is now more than double what it was four years ago – accounting for over 200 million restaurant visits in the past year.


Percentage of U.S. Adults Trying to Cut Down or Avoid Gluten in Their Diets Reaches New High in 2013, Reports NPD

Chicago, March 6, 2013 —As of this January about a third of U.S. adults say they want to cut down or be free of gluten in their diets, the highest percentage making this claim since The NPD Group, a leading global information company, began asking the question in 2009. NPD’s Dieting Monitor,which continually tracks on a bi-weekly basis top-of-mind dieting and nutrition-related issues facing consumers, reports that 30 percent of adults, one in every three adults, claimed to cut down on or avoid gluten completely in January 2013.

“I’m trying to cut back/avoid Gluten in my diet.”

Source: The NPD Group/Dieting Monitor, 52 week data year ending January 30, 2013

“For as long as NPD has been tracking the eating habits of Americans, which is since 1976, they have been expressing a desire to eat healthier foods and beverages,” says Harry Balzer, chief industry analyst and author of Eating Patterns in America. “It’s not that we want health and wellness more but that we are constantly changing how we address health and wellness. A generation ago health was about avoiding fat, cholesterol, sugar, and sodium in our diet. While those desires still exist for many, they no longer are growing concerns. Today, increasingly more of us want to avoid gluten in our diet and right now it is nearly 30 percent of the adult population… and it’s growing. This is the health issue of the day.”

Balzer points out that as recently as 2011, it appeared that this “health” trend might have run its course, but then more Americans started to say they would like to cut back or avoid gluten in their diet. With the latest information collected from NPD’s Dieting Monitor, a greater portion of the adult population is interested in cutting back on or avoiding gluten in their diet than ever before reported.

Interest in gluten-free menu items at restaurants is also growing. In NPD’s CREST® foodservice market research, which tracks daily how consumers use restaurants, consumers are asked if they ordered something off the menu that was listed as high protein, whole grain, sugar-free, or described in another way. The incidence of consumers ordering food described on the menu as gluten-free or wheat-free has grown over time and is now more than double what it was four years ago – accounting for over 200 million restaurant visits in the past year.


Percentage of U.S. Adults Trying to Cut Down or Avoid Gluten in Their Diets Reaches New High in 2013, Reports NPD

Chicago, March 6, 2013 —As of this January about a third of U.S. adults say they want to cut down or be free of gluten in their diets, the highest percentage making this claim since The NPD Group, a leading global information company, began asking the question in 2009. NPD’s Dieting Monitor,which continually tracks on a bi-weekly basis top-of-mind dieting and nutrition-related issues facing consumers, reports that 30 percent of adults, one in every three adults, claimed to cut down on or avoid gluten completely in January 2013.

“I’m trying to cut back/avoid Gluten in my diet.”

Source: The NPD Group/Dieting Monitor, 52 week data year ending January 30, 2013

“For as long as NPD has been tracking the eating habits of Americans, which is since 1976, they have been expressing a desire to eat healthier foods and beverages,” says Harry Balzer, chief industry analyst and author of Eating Patterns in America. “It’s not that we want health and wellness more but that we are constantly changing how we address health and wellness. A generation ago health was about avoiding fat, cholesterol, sugar, and sodium in our diet. While those desires still exist for many, they no longer are growing concerns. Today, increasingly more of us want to avoid gluten in our diet and right now it is nearly 30 percent of the adult population… and it’s growing. This is the health issue of the day.”

Balzer points out that as recently as 2011, it appeared that this “health” trend might have run its course, but then more Americans started to say they would like to cut back or avoid gluten in their diet. With the latest information collected from NPD’s Dieting Monitor, a greater portion of the adult population is interested in cutting back on or avoiding gluten in their diet than ever before reported.

Interest in gluten-free menu items at restaurants is also growing. In NPD’s CREST® foodservice market research, which tracks daily how consumers use restaurants, consumers are asked if they ordered something off the menu that was listed as high protein, whole grain, sugar-free, or described in another way. The incidence of consumers ordering food described on the menu as gluten-free or wheat-free has grown over time and is now more than double what it was four years ago – accounting for over 200 million restaurant visits in the past year.


Percentage of U.S. Adults Trying to Cut Down or Avoid Gluten in Their Diets Reaches New High in 2013, Reports NPD

Chicago, March 6, 2013 —As of this January about a third of U.S. adults say they want to cut down or be free of gluten in their diets, the highest percentage making this claim since The NPD Group, a leading global information company, began asking the question in 2009. NPD’s Dieting Monitor,which continually tracks on a bi-weekly basis top-of-mind dieting and nutrition-related issues facing consumers, reports that 30 percent of adults, one in every three adults, claimed to cut down on or avoid gluten completely in January 2013.

“I’m trying to cut back/avoid Gluten in my diet.”

Source: The NPD Group/Dieting Monitor, 52 week data year ending January 30, 2013

“For as long as NPD has been tracking the eating habits of Americans, which is since 1976, they have been expressing a desire to eat healthier foods and beverages,” says Harry Balzer, chief industry analyst and author of Eating Patterns in America. “It’s not that we want health and wellness more but that we are constantly changing how we address health and wellness. A generation ago health was about avoiding fat, cholesterol, sugar, and sodium in our diet. While those desires still exist for many, they no longer are growing concerns. Today, increasingly more of us want to avoid gluten in our diet and right now it is nearly 30 percent of the adult population… and it’s growing. This is the health issue of the day.”

Balzer points out that as recently as 2011, it appeared that this “health” trend might have run its course, but then more Americans started to say they would like to cut back or avoid gluten in their diet. With the latest information collected from NPD’s Dieting Monitor, a greater portion of the adult population is interested in cutting back on or avoiding gluten in their diet than ever before reported.

Interest in gluten-free menu items at restaurants is also growing. In NPD’s CREST® foodservice market research, which tracks daily how consumers use restaurants, consumers are asked if they ordered something off the menu that was listed as high protein, whole grain, sugar-free, or described in another way. The incidence of consumers ordering food described on the menu as gluten-free or wheat-free has grown over time and is now more than double what it was four years ago – accounting for over 200 million restaurant visits in the past year.


Percentage of U.S. Adults Trying to Cut Down or Avoid Gluten in Their Diets Reaches New High in 2013, Reports NPD

Chicago, March 6, 2013 —As of this January about a third of U.S. adults say they want to cut down or be free of gluten in their diets, the highest percentage making this claim since The NPD Group, a leading global information company, began asking the question in 2009. NPD’s Dieting Monitor,which continually tracks on a bi-weekly basis top-of-mind dieting and nutrition-related issues facing consumers, reports that 30 percent of adults, one in every three adults, claimed to cut down on or avoid gluten completely in January 2013.

“I’m trying to cut back/avoid Gluten in my diet.”

Source: The NPD Group/Dieting Monitor, 52 week data year ending January 30, 2013

“For as long as NPD has been tracking the eating habits of Americans, which is since 1976, they have been expressing a desire to eat healthier foods and beverages,” says Harry Balzer, chief industry analyst and author of Eating Patterns in America. “It’s not that we want health and wellness more but that we are constantly changing how we address health and wellness. A generation ago health was about avoiding fat, cholesterol, sugar, and sodium in our diet. While those desires still exist for many, they no longer are growing concerns. Today, increasingly more of us want to avoid gluten in our diet and right now it is nearly 30 percent of the adult population… and it’s growing. This is the health issue of the day.”

Balzer points out that as recently as 2011, it appeared that this “health” trend might have run its course, but then more Americans started to say they would like to cut back or avoid gluten in their diet. With the latest information collected from NPD’s Dieting Monitor, a greater portion of the adult population is interested in cutting back on or avoiding gluten in their diet than ever before reported.

Interest in gluten-free menu items at restaurants is also growing. In NPD’s CREST® foodservice market research, which tracks daily how consumers use restaurants, consumers are asked if they ordered something off the menu that was listed as high protein, whole grain, sugar-free, or described in another way. The incidence of consumers ordering food described on the menu as gluten-free or wheat-free has grown over time and is now more than double what it was four years ago – accounting for over 200 million restaurant visits in the past year.


Percentage of U.S. Adults Trying to Cut Down or Avoid Gluten in Their Diets Reaches New High in 2013, Reports NPD

Chicago, March 6, 2013 —As of this January about a third of U.S. adults say they want to cut down or be free of gluten in their diets, the highest percentage making this claim since The NPD Group, a leading global information company, began asking the question in 2009. NPD’s Dieting Monitor,which continually tracks on a bi-weekly basis top-of-mind dieting and nutrition-related issues facing consumers, reports that 30 percent of adults, one in every three adults, claimed to cut down on or avoid gluten completely in January 2013.

“I’m trying to cut back/avoid Gluten in my diet.”

Source: The NPD Group/Dieting Monitor, 52 week data year ending January 30, 2013

“For as long as NPD has been tracking the eating habits of Americans, which is since 1976, they have been expressing a desire to eat healthier foods and beverages,” says Harry Balzer, chief industry analyst and author of Eating Patterns in America. “It’s not that we want health and wellness more but that we are constantly changing how we address health and wellness. A generation ago health was about avoiding fat, cholesterol, sugar, and sodium in our diet. While those desires still exist for many, they no longer are growing concerns. Today, increasingly more of us want to avoid gluten in our diet and right now it is nearly 30 percent of the adult population… and it’s growing. This is the health issue of the day.”

Balzer points out that as recently as 2011, it appeared that this “health” trend might have run its course, but then more Americans started to say they would like to cut back or avoid gluten in their diet. With the latest information collected from NPD’s Dieting Monitor, a greater portion of the adult population is interested in cutting back on or avoiding gluten in their diet than ever before reported.

Interest in gluten-free menu items at restaurants is also growing. In NPD’s CREST® foodservice market research, which tracks daily how consumers use restaurants, consumers are asked if they ordered something off the menu that was listed as high protein, whole grain, sugar-free, or described in another way. The incidence of consumers ordering food described on the menu as gluten-free or wheat-free has grown over time and is now more than double what it was four years ago – accounting for over 200 million restaurant visits in the past year.


Percentage of U.S. Adults Trying to Cut Down or Avoid Gluten in Their Diets Reaches New High in 2013, Reports NPD

Chicago, March 6, 2013 —As of this January about a third of U.S. adults say they want to cut down or be free of gluten in their diets, the highest percentage making this claim since The NPD Group, a leading global information company, began asking the question in 2009. NPD’s Dieting Monitor,which continually tracks on a bi-weekly basis top-of-mind dieting and nutrition-related issues facing consumers, reports that 30 percent of adults, one in every three adults, claimed to cut down on or avoid gluten completely in January 2013.

“I’m trying to cut back/avoid Gluten in my diet.”

Source: The NPD Group/Dieting Monitor, 52 week data year ending January 30, 2013

“For as long as NPD has been tracking the eating habits of Americans, which is since 1976, they have been expressing a desire to eat healthier foods and beverages,” says Harry Balzer, chief industry analyst and author of Eating Patterns in America. “It’s not that we want health and wellness more but that we are constantly changing how we address health and wellness. A generation ago health was about avoiding fat, cholesterol, sugar, and sodium in our diet. While those desires still exist for many, they no longer are growing concerns. Today, increasingly more of us want to avoid gluten in our diet and right now it is nearly 30 percent of the adult population… and it’s growing. This is the health issue of the day.”

Balzer points out that as recently as 2011, it appeared that this “health” trend might have run its course, but then more Americans started to say they would like to cut back or avoid gluten in their diet. With the latest information collected from NPD’s Dieting Monitor, a greater portion of the adult population is interested in cutting back on or avoiding gluten in their diet than ever before reported.

Interest in gluten-free menu items at restaurants is also growing. In NPD’s CREST® foodservice market research, which tracks daily how consumers use restaurants, consumers are asked if they ordered something off the menu that was listed as high protein, whole grain, sugar-free, or described in another way. The incidence of consumers ordering food described on the menu as gluten-free or wheat-free has grown over time and is now more than double what it was four years ago – accounting for over 200 million restaurant visits in the past year.



Comments:

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